Tag Archives: family

Think Write Thursday

I am so thankful for prompts – even if they aren’t a very good fit.  The prompt from Caroleknits on Think Write Thursday is to share about a movie I often quote from.  Well, if my husband was responding to this prompt he would definitely have a movie in mind and lots of quotes to reference.  But I’m not the media person in the family.  However, when I read this prompt I realized there are a few lines from movies that pop into my head often – or at least frequently enough I would call them favorite lines with special or significant meaning to me.  I’m sure you will recognize them:

“We’re not in Kansas any more.”  and “There’s no place like home.” from…..you guessed it – The Wizard of Oz.

The other quote I love and use is from Star Trek – don’t ask me which one or when but it is familiar: “Beam me up Scottie.”

What I think is interesting is how these quotes are related and speak to a common theme I – we – confront often: dealing with change and the unexpected. I don’t think I really realized how much I confront change on a daily basis because in reality, my life is pretty much the same day to day.  But the world is changing so fast; I am not living in the 1950’s times I was born into or the 60’s and 70’s I grew up in and yet I am adapting and accepting change.

Part of the reasons I can do that is because “there is no place like home” and… I have people who can beam me up when I need to escape!


message – July 15

Message in a bottle for July 15th -“being a caring sibling”

I’m not much of a hiker
but I heard the view was worth the climb
so I headed out.
Midway to the top,
the trail was cut by the very stream
below the falls I was headed to see.

A shimmed log lay across the cut
and a crew was at work on the rope railings
but there was nothing in place
for me at this juncture in my hike.

I watched another hiker grit her teeth
and bravely walk across the log.
I knew that wasn’t going to work for me;
my imagination would get the best of me.
I sat straight down on the wet surface
and scooted across like a toddler.

The rest of the hike was not so bad after that
and when I returned to the log,
the railing was in place.
I was glad to be able to cross with some dignity this time
and to know it will be easier the next time
I pass this way.


message – July 11

Message in a bottle for July 11th – “Being a close family”

July 4, 2016
after a 5 year journey, the interplanetary probe, Juno,
finally entered Jupiter’s orbit
the scientists who had worked together for this venture
cheered and danced after a sleepless night
they celebrated their hard work, planning and vision
now another adventure begins:
to learn what lies behind and beneath
another piece of the heavens

stardust beckons stardust
and we go to the heavens
seeking to unite light
how lucky we are


5/30 May-be

there are days in the time since my children became adults that I have been glad they are out of my house and safely occupied somewhere I presume and I need not worry about them

there are days in the time since my children have become adults that I don’t hear from them for days and though they are surely safely somewhere, I worry


5/28 May-be

10 girls enjoying pizza after a pool party
1 girl celebrating her 11th birthday
1 best friend from another town
1 girl losing her tooth while she ate
3 girls huddled together, singing a song and rapping on the table
3 girls watching everything quietly from corner positions
1 girl with a green explosion of color on her hair, apparently applied in the pool changing room

10 girls on the threshold
of what lies beyond childhood


5/17 May-be

I see on Facebook that one of my cousins on my dad’s side is celebrating a birthday today.  We only saw each other a handful of times when we were growing up on the east coast. Now she lives a couple of hours away but what I know about her is only what she reveals on social media.

Yet I still feel a connection as she was one of three cousins my age.   My parents were the renegades who deliberately moved away from “family.” When they did, I think they missed the summer visits to Cape Cod and Cooperstown because they were special places but they didn’t really miss the complications of getting along with aging relations.

So I’ve had to learn for myself what “big family” means.  By that, I mean family relations beyond mom and dad, brothers and sisters.  Since my marriage and having kids, I am now a part of family that gets together regularly, celebrates the unique and special relationships between cousins and the lovely and unique quality of grandparent-grandchild relationships. I really wish I’d been able to have some of this for myself growing up but I’m glad it is there for my kids.

Sure, the relationships can be tricky as we age and become stuck in our thinking and sensitive about various issues.  But family is the first way and last way we learn about community and how to really live among different people.

So Happy Birthday cousin, it’s been fun to see the toasts from our far-flung family on Facebook and I hope you have a banner year!

 


marcescence 2

(this kind of goes along with yesterday’s post…)

My mom wrote letters to her mother once a week throughout her adult life as long as herimage mom was alive. Onion skin-like sheets of paper typed single space and often with carbon paper so she could send a duplicate to someone else.

My grandmother saved every one – tucked in their original envelope, stacked neatly in shoe boxes.

Now my mother, currently older than my grandmother was when she died 30 years ago, is dutifully pulling those letters from the envelopes, reading them and putting them into plastic sleeves.

She tells me she doesn’t remember half the stuff she wrote about all those years ago. I’ve read a few of the letters as well as some I sent to my grandmother – because she saved those too – and I don’t remember the stuff I wrote about either.  Or what I read just really doesn’t match up with what I’ve come to remember as most consequential from those blocks of time.  I am realizing that what I chose to document really isn’t what became  most important after all.

My mom is putting the plastic sleeves into now bulging notebooks.  “I don’t know what you guys will do with these.” (I have 3 siblings.)  “I don’t really care, maybe you don’t really care.”

I don’t know how I feel.  I read through some of the story bits and am entertained. There are snippets of accounts of our escapades in school, camp, family trips, daily doings. There are little sketches and poems and doodles and stanzas from camp songs. It is charming, all of it.

But I don’t know what to hold on to or let go.  Does an account like this matter – filling in the gaps as it does – when what we actually remember and hold dear is vastly different or at best only a mere essence of the recorded detail?   Does accuracy in memory really matter when time creates a new reality?   Will knowing what my mom recorded as significant affect or change my relationship with her, my dad, my siblings or myself?

Marcescence

shall I let these carefully preserved records of daily details fall as compost to the new memories I’m creating every day

and/or

keep them in place in their plastic sleeves, preserving their truth and posterity, as witness to the past

or

let them go

(I know my siblings will have their own opinions)

I suppose all memories eventually become fodder – forgotten, discarded, or folded into some new venture. The present continuously demands our full attention no matter the care we take to preserve the past – plastic sleeves, shoe boxes, notebooks, blogs, Facebook.  Time will not be denied the light of tomorrow and tomorrow’s light always alters what we see through a lens.